STS-51L Space Shuttle Challenger Explosion Investigation 1986 Presidential Commission

STS-51L Space Shuttle Challenger Explosion Investigation 1986 Presidential Commission

more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/astro/space_shuttle_news.html Space Shuttle Challenger Accident Investigation. Photo and TV Analysis Team Report of the STS-51L Data & Design Analysis Task Force, a documentation video for the Rogers Commission (the Presidential Commission on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accident). Public domain film from NASA, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Shuttle_Challenger_disaster The Space Shuttle Challenger disaster occurred on January 28, 1986, when the NASA Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger (OV-099) (mission STS-51-L) broke apart 73 seconds into its flight, leading to the deaths of its seven crew members, which included five NASA astronauts and two Payload Specialists. The spacecraft disintegrated over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Cape Canaveral, Florida at 11:38 EST (16:38 UTC). Disintegration of the vehicle began after an O-ring seal in its right solid rocket booster (SRB) failed at liftoff. The O-ring failure caused a breach in the SRB joint it sealed, allowing pressurized burning gas from within the solid rocket motor to reach the outside and impinge upon the adjacent SRB aft field joint attachment hardware and external fuel tank. This led to the separation of the right-hand SRB's aft field joint attachment and the structural failure of the external tank. Aerodynamic forces broke up the orbiter. The crew compartment and many other vehicle fragments were eventually recovered from the ocean floor after a lengthy search and recovery operation. The exact timing of the death of the crew is unknown; several crew members are known to have survived the initial breakup of the spacecraft. The shuttle had no escape system, and the impact of the crew compartment with the ocean surface was too violent to be survivable. The disaster resulted in a 32-month hiatus in the shuttle program and the formation of the Rogers Commission, a special commission appointed by United States President Ronald Reagan to investigate the accident. The Rogers Commission found NASA's organizational culture and decision-making processes had been key contributing factors to the accident. NASA managers had known contractor Morton Thiokol's design of the SRBs contained a potentially catastrophic flaw in the O-rings since 1977, but failed to address it properly. They also disregarded warnings (an example of "go fever") from engineers about the dangers of launching, posed by the low temperatures of that morning, and failed to adequately report these technical concerns to their superiors. What the Rogers Commission report did not highlight was that the vehicle was never certified to operate in temperatures that low. The O-rings, as well as many other critical components, had no test data to support any expectation of a successful launch in such conditions. Bob Ebeling from Thiokol delivered a biting analysis: "[W]e're only qualified to 40 degrees ...'what business does anyone even have thinking about 18 degrees, we're in no man's land.'" As a result of the disaster, the Air Force decided to cancel its plans to use the Shuttle for classified military satellite launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, deciding to use the Titan IV instead. Approximately 17 percent of Americans witnessed the launch live because of the presence of Payload Specialist Christa McAuliffe, who would have been the first teacher in space. Media coverage of the accident was extensive: one study reported that 85 percent of Americans surveyed had heard the news within an hour of the accident. The Challenger disaster has been used as a case study in many discussions of engineering safety and workplace ethics...

Strut Bar - Explained

Strut Bar - Explained

What is a strut bar? How does a strut bar work? What forces act on the strut bar through the suspension? A strut bar, or tower bar, connects the top strut towers together, in order to increase the rigidity of a vehicle by allowing both strut towers to react to compression and tensile forces. A strut bar plays a larger role for MacPherson strut vehicles, however it can still be important in vehicles with double wishbones as well for compensating vertical forces. Check out the strut bars from this video at: http://www.redline360.com/ Front Strut: http://www.redline360.com/megan-racing-strut-tower-bar-acura-integra-front-upper-MR-SB-HC8800FU Rear Strut: http://www.redline360.com/megan-racing-strut-tower-bar-acura-integra-rear-upper-MR-SB-HC88RU You may also want to know more about the suspension types discussed in this video. Suspensions: http://youtu.be/jOiOO7qloXQ MacPherson Strut: http://youtu.be/1fvJMxErfms Double Wishbone Suspension: http://youtu.be/DsEmK1M87VQ Please feel free to rate, comment, and subscribe! And don't forget to check out my Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/engineeringexplained Also check out my official website: Make suggestions, participate in forums, learn through logically ordered lessons, read FAQs, and plan your future! http://www.howdoesacarwork.com Now on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jasonfenske13 NEW VIDEO EVERY WEDNESDAY!

Putting Training & Trust to the Test

Putting Training & Trust to the Test

Do you know what it takes to be a U.S. Army Soldier? These Soldiers discuss how teamwork and training lead to successful missions out in the field.

Minecraft Story Mode (Funny Animation)

Minecraft Story Mode (Funny Animation)

WANT MORE? Support our animation on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/smashbits SmashBits Merch: https://crowdmade.com/collections/smashbitsanimations Support our animators for MORE: https://www.patreon.com/smashbits CREATED BY Ricky St Jones (SmashBits) http://youtube.com/SmashBits WRITTEN AND AUDIO MIXED BY: Dexter Manning https://www.youtube.com/TheDexterManning ANIMATED BY Kevin Lordi https://www.youtube.com/user/KevinLsAccount STARRING Dexter Manning as Most Jesse - Dexter Manning Narrator - Fryaut Axel - Sebastian Todd Petra - Dexter Manning Olivia - Tiana Camacho Soren - Kanonog Ivor - CavemanFilms Magnus - Michael Edwards Ellegard - Olivia Brown Lucas - Sebastian Todd Gabriel - Mike Ndukwe ANIMATION Art - Kevin Lordi Layout - Kevin Lordi Layout - Katrina Tumasz Animation - Seth Whitehurst Animation - Katrina Tumasz Animation - Jodi Lorenzo Animation - Chris Durgin -------------- SmashBits Social (follow us!) �мNew to SmashBits? Subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=smashbits �мTwitter: https://twitter.com/Smash_Bits �мFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/SmashBitsStudios �мWebsite: www.smashbits.net �мGoogle+: https://www.facebook.com/SmashBitsStudios -------------- A SPECIAL thank you to our Patreon patrons! Mczack Underling39 Echoen Rupix S B Cauldoneer Banyan Torey Beauchum Justin Benavides Trysten Rocchi Deadman Studios Herman Stenehmjem Nathaniel Gonzales Michael Wadsworth

Missiles, Solid Fueled: "Solid Punch" pt1-2 circa 1962 "The Big Picture" US Army Chet Huntley

Missiles, Solid Fueled: "Solid Punch" pt1-2 circa 1962 "The Big Picture" US Army Chet Huntley

more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html "Narrated by Chet Huntley, "Solid Punch" graphically illustrates the technological advances made in the development of solid rocket fuels. These fuels, the result of close cooperation between the Armed Forces and American Industry, have greatly increased the transportability of our tactical missiles and have simplified their firing procedures. This interesting documentary traces the history pf the U.S. Army missiles and shows examples of their types, uses, and versatility. As a public service, this program concludes with a one-minute U.S. Army Recruiting Service trailer." NEW VERSION in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LvmhXFxloWk Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization. Split with MKVmerge GUI (part of MKVToolNix), the same software can recombine the downloaded parts (in mp4 format): http://www.bunkus.org/videotools/mkvtoolnix/doc/mkvmerge-gui.html part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3vs521itmQ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Nike Project Nike was a U.S. Army project, proposed in May 1945 by Bell Laboratories, to develop a line-of-sight anti-aircraft missile system. The project delivered the United States' first operational anti-aircraft missile system, the Nike Ajax, in 1953... The missile's first-stage solid rocket booster became the basis for many types of rocket including the Nike Hercules missile and NASA's Nike Smoke rocket, used for upper-atmosphere research... For Nike, three radars were used. The acquisition radar searched for a target to be handed over to the Target Tracking Radar (TTR) for tracking. The Missile Tracking Radar (MTR) tracked the missile by way of a transponder, as the missile's radar signature alone was not sufficient. The MTR also commanded the missile by way of pulse-position modulation, the pulses were received, decoded and then amplified back for the MTR to track. Once the tracking radars were locked the system was able to work automatically following launch, barring any unexpected occurrences. The computer compared the two radars' directions, along with information on the speeds and distances, to calculate the intercept point and steer the missile... The Douglas-built missile was a two stage missile using a solid fuel booster stage and a liquid fueled (IRFNA/UDMH) second stage. The missile could reach a maximum speed of 1,000 mph (1,600 km/h), an altitude of 70,000 ft (21 km) and had a range of 25 miles (40 km). The missile contained an unusual three part payload, with explosive fragmentation charges at three points down the length of the missile to help ensure a lethal hit... The first successful Nike test was during November 1951, intercepting a drone B-17 Flying Fortress. The first type, Nike Ajax (MIM-3), were deployed starting in 1953... Even as Nike Ajax was being tested, work started on Nike-B, later renamed Nike Hercules (MIM-14). It improved speed, range and accuracy, and could intercept ballistic missiles. The Hercules had a range of about 100 miles (160 km), a top speed in excess of 3,000 mph (4,800 km/h) and a maximum altitude of around 100,000 ft (30 km). It had solid fuel boost and sustainer rocket motors... Development continued, producing Improved Nike Hercules and then Nike Zeus A and B. The Zeus was aimed at intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs). Zeus, with a new 400,000 lbf (1.78 MN) thrust solid-fuel booster, was first test launched during August 1959 and demonstrated a top speed of 8,000 mph (12,875 km/h). The Nike Zeus system also included the Zeus Acquisition Radar (ZAR), a significant improvement over the Nike Hercules HIPAR system. Shaped like a pyramid, the ZAR featured a Luneburg lens receiver aerial weighing about 1,000 tons. The first successful intercept of an ICBM by Zeus was in 1962, at Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands. Despite its technological advancements, the Department of Defense terminated Zeus development in 1963... Still, the Army continued to develop an anti-ICBM weapon system referred to as "Nike-X" - that was largely based on the technological advances of the Zeus system. Nike-X featured phase-array radars, computer advances, and a missile tolerant of skin temperatures three times those of the Zeus. In September 1967, the Department of Defense announced the deployment of the LIM-49A Spartan missile system, its major elements drawn from Nike X development. In March 1969. the Army started the Safeguard ABM program, which was designed to defend Minuteman ICBMs, and which was also based on the Nike-X system. It became operational in 1975, but was shut down after just three months...

Shuttle Shot Down - Intro News Footage

Shuttle Shot Down - Intro News Footage

Link to images and video: http://bit.ly/ShuttleShot This is related to: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=lI5iGN132P8 3 video playlist: http://uk.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=104AB177A130EC33 This weird shaped object caught briefly by the news camera on a high zoom appears to be the shuttle just prior to getting zapped. You need to watch all parts in full to get the details or full article and data: http://exopolitics.org.uk - search "Shuttle Shot Down"

★ Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster - Short Documentary - HD

★ Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster - Short Documentary - HD

The Space Shuttle Challenger disaster occurred on January 28, 1986, when Space Shuttle Challenger (mission STS-51-L) broke apart 73 seconds into its flight, leading to the deaths of its seven crew members. My photos: https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/105656643463219506384/+aheli ★ The Largest Stars in the Universe | Infographic Animation ► https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqAJnrL27OY ★ The Most Astounding Fact - Neil deGrasse Tyson | Kinetic ►Typography https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2DXqJ7mjKY ★ TOP 10 - Best of Hubble Space Telescope - 2015 ► http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lmx19_0GX8o The spacecraft disintegrated over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Cape Canaveral, Florida at 11:38 EST (16:38 UTC). Disintegration of the vehicle began after an O-ring seal in its right solid rocket booster (SRB) failed at liftoff. The O-ring failure caused a breach in the SRB joint it sealed, allowing pressurized hot gas from within the solid rocket motor to reach the outside and impinge upon the adjacent SRB attachment hardware and external fuel tank. This led to the separation of the right-hand SRB's aft attachment and the structural failure of the external tank. Aerodynamic forces broke up the orbiter. The crew compartment and many other vehicle fragments were eventually recovered from the ocean floor after a lengthy search and recovery operation. The exact timing of the death of the crew is unknown; several crew members are known to have survived the initial breakup of the spacecraft. The shuttle had no escape system, and the impact of the crew compartment with the ocean surface was too violent to be survivable. The disaster resulted in a 32-month hiatus in the shuttle program and the formation of the Rogers Commission, a special commission appointed by United States President Ronald Reagan to investigate the accident. The Rogers Commission found NASA's organizational culture and decision-making processes had been key contributing factors to the accident. NASA managers had known contractor Morton Thiokol's design of the SRBs contained a potentially catastrophic flaw in the O-rings since 1977, but failed to address it properly. They also disregarded warnings (an example of "go fever") from engineers about the dangers of launching posed by the low temperatures of that morning and had failed in adequately reporting these technical concerns to their superiors. What Rogers did not highlight was that the vehicle was never certified to operate in temperatures that low. The O-rings, as well as many other critical components, had no test data to support any expectation of a successful launch in such conditions. Bob Ebeling from Thiokol delivered a biting analysis: "[W]e're only qualified to 40 degrees ...'what business does anyone even have thinking about 18 degrees, we're in no man's land.'" As a result of the disaster, the Air Force decided to cancel its plans to use the Shuttle for classified military satellite launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, deciding to use the Titan IV instead. Approximately 17 percent of Americans witnessed the launch live because of the presence of crew member Christa McAuliffe, the first member of the Teacher in Space Project, who would have been the first teacher in space. Media coverage of the accident was extensive: one study reported that 85 percent of Americans surveyed had heard the news within an hour of the accident. In memory of the crew of space shuttle Challenger. RIP The clip is from "When We Left Earth: The NASA Missions (2008)"

U.S. rocket debris found across ocean

U.S. rocket debris found across ocean

A piece of debris, likely from a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, has been found floating off the coast of England.

Space Shuttle 1st Flight STS-1 Columbia Post Flight Press Conference 1981 NASA; Young, Crippen

Space Shuttle 1st Flight STS-1 Columbia Post Flight Press Conference 1981 NASA; Young, Crippen

Space Shuttle Missions playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL432F188226C29E68 more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/astro/space_shuttle_news.html "Commander: John W. Young Pilot: Robert L. Crippen Dates: April 12-14, 1981 Vehicle: Columbia OV-102 Payloads: DFI and ACIP Landing site: Runway 23 dry lakebed at Edwards AFB, CA" NASA film JSC-816 Reupload of a previously uploaded film, in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound. Originally a public domain film from NASA, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-1 Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ STS-1 was the first orbital flight of NASA's Space Shuttle program. Space Shuttle Columbia launched on 12 April 1981, and returned to Earth on 14 April, having orbited the Earth 37 times during the 54.5-hour mission. It was the first American manned space flight since the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project on 15 July 1975. STS-1 was the only US manned maiden test flight of a new spacecraft system, although it was the culmination of atmospheric testing of the Space Shuttle orbiter... The first launch of the Space Shuttle occurred on 12 April 1981, exactly 20 years after the first manned space flight, when the orbiter Columbia, with two crew members, astronauts John W. Young, commander, and Robert L. Crippen, pilot, lifted off from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, at the Kennedy Space Center. This was the first of 24 launches from Pad A. The launch took place at precisely 7 a.m. EST. A launch attempt two days earlier was scrubbed because of a timing problem in one of Columbia's general-purpose computers. Not only was this the first launch of the Space Shuttle, but it marked the first time that solid-fuel rockets were used for a NASA manned launch (although all of the Mercury and Apollo astronauts had relied on a solid-fuel motor in their escape towers). STS-1 was also the first U.S. manned space vehicle launched without an unmanned powered test flight. The STS-1 orbiter, Columbia, also holds the record for the amount of time spent in the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) before launch -- 610 days, the time needed for the replacement of many of its heat shield tiles. The primary mission objectives of the maiden flight were to perform a general check out of the Space Shuttle system, accomplish a safe ascent into orbit and to return to Earth for a safe landing. The only payload carried on the mission was a Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI) package, which contained sensors and measuring devices to record the orbiter's performance and the stresses that occurred during launch, ascent, orbital flight, descent and landing. All of these objectives were met successfully, and the orbiter's spaceworthiness was verified. During flight day 2, the astronauts received a phone call from Vice President George H. W. Bush. President Ronald Reagan originally intended to visit the Mission Control Center during the mission, but at the time was still recovering from an assassination attempt which had taken place two weeks before the launch. Columbia reached an orbital altitude of 166 nautical miles (307 km). The 37-orbit, 1,074,567-mile (1,729,348 km)-long flight lasted 2 days, 6 hours, 20 minutes and 53 seconds. Landing occurred on Runway 23 at Edwards Air Force Base, California, at 10:21 am PST, 14 April 1981. Columbia was returned to Kennedy Space Center from California on 28 April atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft... During remarks at a 2003 gathering, John Young stated that a protruding tile gap filler ducted hot gas into the right main landing gear well, which caused significant damage, including the buckling of the landing gear. Buckling of the door, but not the landing gear, was documented in the post-flight anomaly report... John Young's remarks: http://www.thespacereview.com/article/15/1

Try Not To Laugh Challenge - Funny Fails Vine compilation 2017

Try Not To Laugh Challenge - Funny Fails Vine compilation 2017

Try Not To Laugh or Grin While Watching Funny Fails Vines compilation 2017 Subscribe to CooL Vines ► http://goo.gl/AO95W6

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