DFN:Reenlistment Bonus: MARADMIN 370/18 UNITED STATES 07.02.2018

DFN:Reenlistment Bonus: MARADMIN 370/18 UNITED STATES 07.02.2018

► Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/DefenseFlashNews ► CHECK OUT THIS 9000+ MORE VIDEOS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgt2lndbOCnYwrhRgL3jhp_RKJ_I9XrPC Defense Flash News: Reenlistment Bonus: MARADMIN 370/18 UNITED STATES 07.02.2018 Courtesy Video Defense Media Activity - Marines This bulletin announces the SRB program and the BSSRB program authorized for FY19. With the advent of several new SRB programs, Marines are encouraged to thoroughly review the contents of this bulletin. "All Marines provide value to the team, but we need the very best Marines in critical field--like infantry squad leaders and aviation maintainers to stay in service and continue to lead, train, and prepare us to dominate the next fight." ~ Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Robert B. Neller. TAGS,Reenlistment,Benefits,Bonus,DMA,Marine Corps,Marines,Digital Engagement Team,MARADMIN 370/18,Retainment,SRB programs,BSSRB General tags:defense flash news,defence news,MILITARY,Weapons,Aircraft,Ships,Vehicles,Operations,air force,navy,marine,army,Snipers,Firefights,Afghanistan,Guns & Weapons,Iraq,Explosions,SpecOps,Military Aircraft,Ships & Subs,Syria,Global Hot Spots,Vehicles,Air Force,Marine Corps,Navy,Army,Coast Guard,Events,Army Deployment,Technology,Military News,Fitness,Special Operations,Entertainment, united states,usa,UNITED KINGDOM,uk,china,canada,australia,france,GERMANY,japan,russia,india,technology in defense,new technology in defence,Observation Post,BBC,Bloomberg,Stars and Stripes,Fox News,CNN,MSNBC,USA Today,PBS,ABC News,The Daily Show,Leatherneck,NPR,The Colbert Report,Slate,The Economist,CBS News,The Washington post,Military Times,military embedded systems magazine,Navy Times,The New York Times,Marine Corps Gazette,MSN,The Guardian,The New Yorker,Politico,APG News,Business Insider,Military Spouse Magazine,Quantico Sentry,Gulf Defender,DC Military,Marines.mil. Marine Corps Times,The Wallstreet Journal,Google News,The Blaze,Yahoo News,Mother Jones,Breitbart,The Huffington Post,Think Progress,Drudge Report,Daily KOS,The Sean Hannity show,Al Jezeera America,The Ed Shultz Show,The Glenn Beck Program,The Rush Limbaugh Show,Vietnow National Magazine,Veterans of foreign magazine,Northwest Airlifter,Navy Compass,Military Review magazine,GI Jobs magazine,Hilltop Times,Defenses News,Annapolis Trident,1st Infantry Division Post

Missiles, Solid Fueled: "Solid Punch" pt1-2 circa 1962 "The Big Picture" US Army Chet Huntley

Missiles, Solid Fueled: "Solid Punch" pt1-2 circa 1962 "The Big Picture" US Army Chet Huntley

more at http://quickfound.net/links/military_news_and_links.html "Narrated by Chet Huntley, "Solid Punch" graphically illustrates the technological advances made in the development of solid rocket fuels. These fuels, the result of close cooperation between the Armed Forces and American Industry, have greatly increased the transportability of our tactical missiles and have simplified their firing procedures. This interesting documentary traces the history pf the U.S. Army missiles and shows examples of their types, uses, and versatility. As a public service, this program concludes with a one-minute U.S. Army Recruiting Service trailer." NEW VERSION in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LvmhXFxloWk Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization. Split with MKVmerge GUI (part of MKVToolNix), the same software can recombine the downloaded parts (in mp4 format): http://www.bunkus.org/videotools/mkvtoolnix/doc/mkvmerge-gui.html part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3vs521itmQ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Nike Project Nike was a U.S. Army project, proposed in May 1945 by Bell Laboratories, to develop a line-of-sight anti-aircraft missile system. The project delivered the United States' first operational anti-aircraft missile system, the Nike Ajax, in 1953... The missile's first-stage solid rocket booster became the basis for many types of rocket including the Nike Hercules missile and NASA's Nike Smoke rocket, used for upper-atmosphere research... For Nike, three radars were used. The acquisition radar searched for a target to be handed over to the Target Tracking Radar (TTR) for tracking. The Missile Tracking Radar (MTR) tracked the missile by way of a transponder, as the missile's radar signature alone was not sufficient. The MTR also commanded the missile by way of pulse-position modulation, the pulses were received, decoded and then amplified back for the MTR to track. Once the tracking radars were locked the system was able to work automatically following launch, barring any unexpected occurrences. The computer compared the two radars' directions, along with information on the speeds and distances, to calculate the intercept point and steer the missile... The Douglas-built missile was a two stage missile using a solid fuel booster stage and a liquid fueled (IRFNA/UDMH) second stage. The missile could reach a maximum speed of 1,000 mph (1,600 km/h), an altitude of 70,000 ft (21 km) and had a range of 25 miles (40 km). The missile contained an unusual three part payload, with explosive fragmentation charges at three points down the length of the missile to help ensure a lethal hit... The first successful Nike test was during November 1951, intercepting a drone B-17 Flying Fortress. The first type, Nike Ajax (MIM-3), were deployed starting in 1953... Even as Nike Ajax was being tested, work started on Nike-B, later renamed Nike Hercules (MIM-14). It improved speed, range and accuracy, and could intercept ballistic missiles. The Hercules had a range of about 100 miles (160 km), a top speed in excess of 3,000 mph (4,800 km/h) and a maximum altitude of around 100,000 ft (30 km). It had solid fuel boost and sustainer rocket motors... Development continued, producing Improved Nike Hercules and then Nike Zeus A and B. The Zeus was aimed at intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs). Zeus, with a new 400,000 lbf (1.78 MN) thrust solid-fuel booster, was first test launched during August 1959 and demonstrated a top speed of 8,000 mph (12,875 km/h). The Nike Zeus system also included the Zeus Acquisition Radar (ZAR), a significant improvement over the Nike Hercules HIPAR system. Shaped like a pyramid, the ZAR featured a Luneburg lens receiver aerial weighing about 1,000 tons. The first successful intercept of an ICBM by Zeus was in 1962, at Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands. Despite its technological advancements, the Department of Defense terminated Zeus development in 1963... Still, the Army continued to develop an anti-ICBM weapon system referred to as "Nike-X" - that was largely based on the technological advances of the Zeus system. Nike-X featured phase-array radars, computer advances, and a missile tolerant of skin temperatures three times those of the Zeus. In September 1967, the Department of Defense announced the deployment of the LIM-49A Spartan missile system, its major elements drawn from Nike X development. In March 1969. the Army started the Safeguard ABM program, which was designed to defend Minuteman ICBMs, and which was also based on the Nike-X system. It became operational in 1975, but was shut down after just three months...

Department of Defense - Stiletto High Tech Water Craft

Department of Defense - Stiletto High Tech Water Craft

The "Stiletto," a shallow-water craft made of a tough, lightweight carbon composite material, offers a safer, more comfortable ride and is easily reconfigured to accommodate technological advances and the military's needs, said Navy Cmdr. Greg E. Glaros, a transformation strategist in the Office of Force Transformation. Stiletto was initiated in the DoD transformation office in association with U.S. Special Operations Command, he said. When fielded, the boat will be available for use my all services. It's meant to get special operations forces to their missions quickly with a top speed of more than 50 knots, Glaros said. Those forces, a total of 15 per boat, also could benefit from its unusual hull design. Described as an "M-hull" because of its resemblance to the letter "M," the water Stiletto displaces is pulled through tunnels under the boat. The water mixes with incoming air from the forward movement of the craft and creates an air cushion that the boat rides on, he said. Glaros said this cushion could be a back-saving benefit for those using Stiletto for transport. The vertical impact to the neck and the spine from riding on a traditional small transport craft have been likened to a "10-G shock," or the body suddenly weighing 10 times its own weight, at least twice an hour, he said. If a seat fails, that shock can spike to 20 Gs. Stiletto's other purposes include what Glaros describes as "techno exploration." Basically, he said, the boat is a floating experiment. The office wanted to understand the uses and the limits of composite materials in this type of application. The boat's design also anticipates advances in technology, he said. "In our world today, the most powerful element is information," Glaros said. "For us, it would be folly to build anything that didn't have the means with which to connect to the outer world." Stiletto's "electronic keel" provides that connection, he said. The system offers open access to its network for various uses by all services, Glaros said. Its plug-and-play nature makes it adaptable to advancing technologies. While any force can customize the hull for a specific purpose, Glaros said, it was designed with servicemembers in mind. "They're at the heart of this," he said. "Give them something that they can change and manipulate on their own and doesn't damage them more than the enemy." Fifteen months after the contract to build Stiletto was signed, the boat is considered "operational experimental," Glaros said, though he is uncertain when it will be fielded. The boat will be put through its paces with Naval Special Clearance Team 1 in early May. To date, the ship has cost about $12.5 million, Glaros said. About one-fourth of that went to building computer-aided models and more operational testing.

STS-51L Space Shuttle Challenger Explosion Investigation 1986 Presidential Commission

STS-51L Space Shuttle Challenger Explosion Investigation 1986 Presidential Commission

Space Shuttle Challenger Accident Investigation. Photo and TV Analysis Team Report of the STS-51L Data & Design Analysis Task Force, a documentation video for the Rogers Commission (the Presidential Commission on the Space Shuttle Challenger Accident). Public domain film from NASA https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Shuttle_Challenger_disaster The Space Shuttle Challenger disaster occurred on January 28, 1986, when the NASA Space Shuttle orbiter Challenger (OV-099) (mission STS-51-L) broke apart 73 seconds into its flight, leading to the deaths of its seven crew members, which included five NASA astronauts and two Payload Specialists. The spacecraft disintegrated over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of Cape Canaveral, Florida at 11:38 EST (16:38 UTC). Disintegration of the vehicle began after an O-ring seal in its right solid rocket booster (SRB) failed at liftoff. The O-ring failure caused a breach in the SRB joint it sealed, allowing pressurized burning gas from within the solid rocket motor to reach the outside and impinge upon the adjacent SRB aft field joint attachment hardware and external fuel tank. This led to the separation of the right-hand SRB's aft field joint attachment and the structural failure of the external tank. Aerodynamic forces broke up the orbiter. The crew compartment and many other vehicle fragments were eventually recovered from the ocean floor after a lengthy search and recovery operation. The exact timing of the death of the crew is unknown; several crew members are known to have survived the initial breakup of the spacecraft. The shuttle had no escape system, and the impact of the crew compartment with the ocean surface was too violent to be survivable. The disaster resulted in a 32-month hiatus in the shuttle program and the formation of the Rogers Commission, a special commission appointed by United States President Ronald Reagan to investigate the accident. The Rogers Commission found NASA's organizational culture and decision-making processes had been key contributing factors to the accident. NASA managers had known contractor Morton Thiokol's design of the SRBs contained a potentially catastrophic flaw in the O-rings since 1977, but failed to address it properly. They also disregarded warnings (an example of "go fever") from engineers about the dangers of launching, posed by the low temperatures of that morning, and failed to adequately report these technical concerns to their superiors. What the Rogers Commission report did not highlight was that the vehicle was never certified to operate in temperatures that low. The O-rings, as well as many other critical components, had no test data to support any expectation of a successful launch in such conditions. Bob Ebeling from Thiokol delivered a biting analysis: "[W]e're only qualified to 40 degrees ...'what business does anyone even have thinking about 18 degrees, we're in no man's land.'" As a result of the disaster, the Air Force decided to cancel its plans to use the Shuttle for classified military satellite launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, deciding to use the Titan IV instead. Approximately 17 percent of Americans witnessed the launch live because of the presence of Payload Specialist Christa McAuliffe, who would have been the first teacher in space. Media coverage of the accident was extensive: one study reported that 85 percent of Americans surveyed had heard the news within an hour of the accident. The Challenger disaster has been used as a case study in many discussions of engineering safety and workplace ethics.

Titan III Research and Development For Today and Tomorrow (1967) US Air Force

Titan III Research and Development For Today and Tomorrow (1967) US Air Force

This video is about Titan III really interesting watch. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titan_IIIC The Titan IIIC was an expendable launch system used by the United States Air Force from 1965 until 1982. It was the first Titan booster to feature large solid rocket motors and was planned to be used as a launcher for the Dyna-Soar and Manned Orbiting Laboratory, though both programs were cancelled before any astronauts flew. The majority of the launcher's payloads were DoD satellites, for military communications and early warning, though one flight (ATS-6) was performed by NASA. The Titan IIIC was launched exclusively from Cape Canaveral while its sibling, the Titan IIID, was launched only from Vandenberg AFB. The Titan rocket family was established in October 1955 when the Air Force awarded the Glenn L. Martin Company (later Martin Marietta and now Lockheed Martin) a contract to build an intercontinental ballistic missile (SM-68). It became known as the Titan I, the nation's first two-stage ICBM, and replaced the Atlas ICBM as the second underground, vertically stored, silo-based ICBM. Both stages of the Titan I used kerosene (RP-1) and liquid oxygen (LOX) as propellants. A subsequent version of the Titan family, the Titan II, was similar to the Titan I, but was much more powerful. Designated as LGM-25C, the Titan II was the largest USAF missile at the time and burned Aerozine 50 and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) rather than RP-1 and LOX. The Titan III family consisted of an enhanced Titan II core with or without solid rocket strap-on boosters and an assortment of upper stages. All SRM-equipped Titans (IIIC, IIID, IIIE, 34D, and IV) launched with only the SRMs firing at liftoff, the core stage not activating until T+105 seconds, shortly before SRM jettison. The Titan IIIA (an early test variant flown in 1964-65) and IIIB (flown from 1966-87 with an Agena D upper stage in both standard and extended tank variants) had no SRMs.[1] The Titan III launchers provided assured capability and flexibility for launch of large-class payloads. All Titan II/III/IV vehicles contained a special range safety system known as the Inadvertent Separation Destruction System (ISDS) that would activate and destroy the first stage if there was a premature second stage separation. Titans that carried SRBs (Titan IIIC, IIID, 34D, and IV) had a second ISDS that consisted of several lanyards attached to the SRBs that would trigger and automatically destroy them if they prematurely separated from the core, said "destruction" consisting mainly of splitting the casings open to release the pressure inside and terminate thrust. The ISDS would end up being used a few times over the Titan's career. Another slight modification to SRB-equipped Titans was the first stage engines being covered instead of the open truss structure on the Titan II/IIIA/IIIB. This was to protect the engines from the heat of the SRB exhaust. Titan III/IV SRBs were fixed nozzle and for roll control, a small tank of nitrogen tetroxide was mounted to each motor. The N2O4 would be injected into the SRB exhaust to deflect it in the desired direction. As the IIIC consisted of mostly proven hardware, launch problems were generally only caused by the upper stages and/or payload. The second launch in October 1965 failed when the Transstage suffered an oxidizer leak and was unable to put its payload (several small satellites) into the correct orbit. The third launch in December experienced a similar failure. The fifth Titan IIIC (August 26, 1966) failed shortly after launch when pieces of the payload fairing started breaking off. Around 80 seconds, the remainder of the shroud disintegrated, causing loss of launch vehicle control as well as the payload (a group of IDCSP satellites intended to provide radio communication for the US Army in Vietnam). The automatic ISDS system activated when one of the SRBs broke away from the stack and destroyed the entire launch vehicle. The exact reason for the shroud failure was not determined, but the fiberglass payload shrouds used on the Titan III up to this point were replaced with a metal shroud afterwards. A Titan IIIC in November 1970 failed to place its missile early warning satellite in the correct orbit due to a Transstage failure and a 1975 launch of a DSCS military comsat left in LEO by another Transstage failure. On March 25, 1978, a launch of a DSCS satellite ended up in the Atlantic Ocean when the Titan second stage hydraulic pump failed, resulting in engine shutdown approximately 470 seconds after launch. The Range Safety destruct command was sent, but it was unclear if the stage received it or if it had already broken up by that point. The first Titan IIIC flew on June 18, 1965 and was the most powerful launcher used by the Air Force until it was replaced by the Titan 34D in 1982. The last IIIC was launched in March 1982.

Shuttle Shot Down - Intro News Footage

Shuttle Shot Down - Intro News Footage

Link to images and video: http://bit.ly/ShuttleShot This is related to: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=lI5iGN132P8 3 video playlist: http://uk.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=104AB177A130EC33 This weird shaped object caught briefly by the news camera on a high zoom appears to be the shuttle just prior to getting zapped. You need to watch all parts in full to get the details or full article and data: http://exopolitics.org.uk - search "Shuttle Shot Down"

WWR: Proposed Changes to Military Retirement System

WWR: Proposed Changes to Military Retirement System

The Weekly Wire Rundown is a weekly video blog from the Office of the Chief of Naval Personnel, highlighting the top stories affecting Sailors and their families. The video compliments the print edition of the @USNPeople Weekly Wire, which you can subscribe to by e-mailing usnpeople@gmail.com. It can also be downloaded at www.navy.mil/cnp. We welcome any question and feedback on personnel matters or how to make this product better serve Sailors and their families.  From this edition of the @USNPeople Weekly Wire:  1.) Military retirement overhaul on fast track/ 27 APRIL 15 [http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/benefits/retirement/2015/04/27/retirement-overhaul-concerns/26244915/] MILITARY TIMES, Leo Shane III The new retirement system also would offer a lump-sum "continuation pay" for service members who stay beyond 12 years of service and the traditional monthly annuity for those who serve for 20 years and beyond. 2.) Navy Seeks Suggestions Regarding Future of Navy and Marine Corps Officers/ 21 APRIL 15 [http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=86755] NAVYLIVE, Naval Service Training Command Public Affairs We need to be invested in our own future. The men and women serving our country right now are the most qualified to provide input on what the Navy will need in the future. Our Navy must stay relevant. Relevancy requires us to invest in both technology and personnel. It requires us to adapt to new mission requirements and the ever-changing state of the world. MMOWGLI is our best opportunity to ensure that we are continually investing in the development of our people, and thereby ensuring our relevancy. 3.) CAP season, for enlisted spot promotions, opens July 1/ 26 APRIL 15 [http://www.navytimes.com/story/military/careers/navy/2015/04/26/command-advancement-program-begins-in-july/25886841/] NAVY TIMES, By Mark D. Faram Instead, COs should be advancing their hot-runners, even those who may be shoe-ins to pick up rank on their next cycle, said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Bill Moran, who added this may be a cultural shift for some commands. "The quality of our force and individual talents of our Sailors have grown dramatically since we introduced CAP in the 1970s,” Moran told Navy Times an April 16 interview. 4.) 6 Things to Know About 2015 Selective Reenlistment Bonus / 01 MAY 15 [http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=86875] SRB provides incentives to Sailors with critical skills and experience to stay Navy. It rewards Sailors who attain special training in skills most needed in the fleet, and helps meet critical skill reenlistment benchmarks and enhance Navy's ability to size, shape and stabilize manning. Award levels are adjusted as reenlistment requirements for specific ratings and skill sets are met. Video produced by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Elliott Fabrizio.

Delta III - The Cursed Child Of Delta Rockets.

Delta III - The Cursed Child Of Delta Rockets.

By Coincidence the Delta III only launched 3 times. None of them with any great success. I talk about what it was, how it compared to the Delta II and Delta IV and why it had such a disasterous career..

Last Moments of Space Shuttle Challenger and Crew

Last Moments of Space Shuttle Challenger and Crew

Space Shuttle Challenger (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-099) was NASA's second Space Shuttle orbiter to be put into service, Columbia being the first. Its maiden flight was on April 4, 1983, and it completed nine missions before breaking apart 73 seconds after the launch of its tenth mission, STS-51-L on January 28, 1986, resulting in the death of all seven crew members. (For more on the Challenger disaster, see Space Shuttle Challenger disaster.) The accident led to a two-and-a-half year grounding of the shuttle fleet, with missions resuming in 1988 with the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on STS-26. Challenger itself was replaced by the Space Shuttle Endeavour, which first launched in 1992. Because of the low production of Orbiters, the Space Shuttle program decided to build a vehicle as a Structural Test Article, STA-099, that could later be converted to a flight vehicle. In order to prevent damage during structural testing, qualification tests were performed to a factor of safety of 1.2 times the design limit loads. The qualification tests were used to validate computational models, and compliance with the required 1.4 factor of safety was shown by analysis.[2] NASA planned to refit the prototype orbiter Enterprise (OV-101), used for flight testing, as the second operational orbiter. However, design changes made during construction of the first orbiter, Columbia (OV-102), would have required extensive rework. Because STA-099's qualification testing prevented damage, NASA found that rebuilding STA-099 as OV-099 would be less expensive than refitting Enterprise. Challenger (and the orbiters built after it) had fewer tiles in its Thermal Protection System than Columbia. Most of the tiles on the payload bay doors, upper wing surface and rear fuselage surface were replaced with DuPont white nomex felt insulation. This modification allowed Challenger to carry 2,500 lb (1,100 kg) more payload than Columbia. Challenger was also the first orbiter to have a head-up display system for use in the descent phase of a mission. After its first flight in April 1983, Challenger quickly became the workhorse of NASA's Space Shuttle fleet, flying far more missions per year than Columbia. In 1983 and 1984, Challenger flew on 85% of all Space Shuttle missions. Even when the orbiters Discovery and Atlantis joined the fleet, Challenger remained in heavy use with three missions a year from 1983-85. Challenger, along with Discovery, was modified at Kennedy Space Center to be able to carry the Centaur-G upper-stage in its payload bay. Had STS-51-L been successful, Challenger's next mission would have been the deployment of the Ulysses probe with the Centaur to study the polar regions of the Sun. Challenger's many spaceflight accomplishments included the first American woman, African-American, and Canadian in space, three Spacelab missions, and the first night launch and landing of a Space Shuttle. Challenger was also the first space shuttle to be destroyed in an accident during a mission. The collected debris of the vessel are currently stored in decommissioned missile silos at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. From time to time, further pieces of debris from the orbiter wash up on the Florida coast.[3] When this happens, they are collected and transported to the silos for storage. Because of its early loss, Challenger was the only space shuttle that never wore the NASA "meatball" logo. Challenger was destroyed in the second minute of STS-51-L, the orbiter's tenth mission, on January 28, 1986 at 11:38:00 a.m. EST ("51-L". http://science.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/m... ), when an O-ring seal on its right solid rocket booster (SRB) failed. The O-rings failed to seal due to a variety of factors, including unusually cold temperatures.[4] This failure allowed a plume of flame to leak out of the SRB and impinge on both the external fuel tank (ET) and SRB aft attachment strut. This caused both structural failure of the ET and the SRB pivoting into the orbiter and ET. The orbiter's attitude rotated out of the normal flight profile and the vehicle assembly then broke apart under aerodynamic loads.

Mike Martin and John Spolsky Honored at Old Grade School, Saint Robert Bellarmine

Mike Martin and John Spolsky Honored at Old Grade School, Saint Robert Bellarmine

Mike Martin, former graduate of Saint Robert Bellarmine in Redford, was given the "Commitment of Excellence" award for his faith, character, academic and tremendous athletic accomplishments. Mike shared this honor with John Spolsky, a former graduate of SRB, who was killed in a car accident in 2008. Mike and John both went to SRG, Detroit Catholic Central and then excelled to the highest level of college football at University of Michigan and Air Force respectively. Video Production: http://www.videovision360.com/

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