A3J Vigilante Operations, USS Enterprise

A3J Vigilante Operations, USS Enterprise

The A3J Vigilante was one of the largest aircraft ever operated from the deck of an aircraft carrier, as shown in this footage taken on the USS Enterprise. This footage can be found on the rocket.aero DVD "Vigilante: A3J and RA-5C." For more information, visit www.rocket.aero

Top 5 Amazing Aircraft Carrier Landings

Top 5 Amazing Aircraft Carrier Landings

► Top Fives is a Disney Partnered Channel! It takes an incredible amount of skill to land a plane on an aircraft carrier. Today we're doing the top five amazing aircraft carrier landings! *Original content produced in studio by JJO Video Media* Several segments are licensed under Creative Commons (CC) U.S Government (CC), U.S 6th Fleet (CC) The Top Fives channel brings you informational and entertaining top five videos from around the world. Join us and subscribe for more. Follow us on Facebook! https://facebook.com/topfivesyoutube Note: The videos featured on the Top Fives channel are for educational and informational purposes. If you have a good idea for a video, leave us a comment! We try to read each and every comment made.

CASTLE RA-5C Vigilante -- Reassembly For Static Display

CASTLE RA-5C Vigilante -- Reassembly For Static Display

Over a period of approximately four years, a North American Aviation RA-5C Vigilante was disassembled at NAS China Lake, transported, and reassembled by volunteers for static display of the Castle Air Museum. For more information on the Castle Air Museum, see: http://www.castleairmuseum.org For an earlier video detailing the mid-wing installation, see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7Z1SCCHPMc Many thanks to everyone who contributed to this project. Rest In Peace Jack, You Will Be Missed. Your friends at Castle.

Convair B-58 Hustler Low Level Bombing Capabilities

Convair B-58 Hustler Low Level Bombing Capabilities

The mach 2 Convair B-58 HUSTLER was the vanguard of low-level bombing techniques used in later aircraft. This old film, salvaged from antiquainted 2" studio tape, reveals the capabilities of this amazing 1950s aircraft.

Aircraft Carrier Crash Landing: Vought F7U Cutlass on USS Hancock 1955 US Navy; JQ Music

Aircraft Carrier Crash Landing: Vought F7U Cutlass on USS Hancock 1955 US Navy; JQ Music

Support this channel: https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney more at http://quickfound.net Massive crash landing of a Vought F7U Cutlass on the USS Hancock. First three good landings are shown. Then a Cutlass misses all of the wires and runs into the barricade, breaking its landing gear in the process. After that another Cutlass snaps its right wheel off while landing. Finally, on 14 July 1955, the sixth Cutlass, aircraft 412, veers off the left side of the deck and explodes into flames. The pilot, Lieutenant Commander Jay T. Alkire, was killed in the crash; several deck crew were injured. Two views are shown of each of the mishap landings. Originally a public domain film from the US Navy, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vought_F7U_Cutlass Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ The Vought F7U Cutlass was a United States Navy carrier-based jet fighter and fighter-bomber of the early Cold War era. It was a highly unusual, semi-tailless design, allegedly based on aerodynamic data and plans captured from the German Arado company at the end of World War II, though Vought designers denied any link to the German research at the time. The F7U was the last aircraft designed by Rex Beisel, who was responsible for the first fighter ever designed specifically for the U.S. Navy, the Curtiss TS-1 of 1922. Regarded as a radical departure from traditional aircraft design, the Cutlass suffered from numerous technical and handling problems throughout its short service career. The type was responsible for the deaths of four test pilots and 21 other U.S. Navy pilots. Over one quarter of all Cutlasses built were destroyed in accidents. The poor safety record was largely the result of the advanced design built to apply new aerodynamic theories and insufficiently powerful, unreliable engines... Three prototypes were ordered in 1946, with the first example flying on 29 September 1948, piloted by Vought's Chief Test Pilot, J. Robert Baker. The maiden flight took place from Naval Air Station Patuxent River and was not without its problems. During testing one of the prototypes reached a maximum speed of 625 mph (1,058 km/h)[7] Production orders were placed for the F7U-1 in a specification very close to the prototypes, and further developed F7U-2 and F7U-3 versions with more powerful engines. Because of development problems with the powerplant, however, the F7U-2 would never be built, while the F7U-3 would incorporate many refinements suggested by tests of the -1. The first 16 F7U-3s had non-afterburning Allison J35-29 engines. The -3, with its Westinghouse J46-WE-8B turbojets, would eventually become the definitive production version, with 288 aircraft equipping 13 U.S. Navy squadrons. Further development stopped once the Vought F8U Crusader flew. The F7U's performance suffered due to a lack of sufficient engine thrust; consequently, its carrier landing and takeoff performance was notoriously poor. The J35 was known to flame out in rain, a very serious fault... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Hancock_(CV-19) USS Hancock (CV/CVA-19) was one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers built during World War II for the United States Navy. The ship was the fourth US Navy ship to bear the name, and was named for John Hancock, president of the Second Continental Congress and first governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Hancock was commissioned in April 1944, and served in several campaigns in the Pacific Theater of Operations, earning four battle stars. Decommissioned shortly after the end of the war, she was modernized and recommissioned in the early 1950s as an attack carrier (CVA). In her second career she operated exclusively in the Pacific, playing a prominent role in the Vietnam War, for which she earned a Navy Unit Commendation. She was the first US Navy carrier to have steam catapults installed. She was decommissioned in early 1976, and sold for scrap later that year...

McDonnell F-101 Voodoo Speed Records: Operation Sun Run & Operation Fire Wall 1957 McDonnell

McDonnell F-101 Voodoo Speed Records: Operation Sun Run & Operation Fire Wall 1957 McDonnell

more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html F-101 Voodoo speed records: "Operation Firewall": a JF-101A set a world speed record of 1,207.6 mph (1,943.4 km/h) on 12 December 1957. "Operation Sun Run," on 27 November 1957, an RF-101C set the Los Angeles-New York-Los Angeles record in 6 hours 46 minutes, the New York to Los Angeles record in 3 hours, 36 minutes, and the Los Angeles to New York record in 3 hours 7 minutes. Public domain film from the US Air Force, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McDonnell_F-101_Voodoo The McDonnell F-101 Voodoo was a supersonic jet fighter which served the United States Air Force (USAF) and the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). Initially designed by McDonnell Aircraft as a long-range bomber escort (known as a penetration fighter) for the Strategic Air Command (SAC), the Voodoo was instead developed as a nuclear-armed fighter-bomber for the Tactical Air Command (TAC), and as a photo reconnaissance aircraft based on the same airframe. Extensively modified versions were produced as an all-weather interceptor aircraft, serving with the Air Defense Command, later renamed the Aerospace Defense Command (ADC), the Air National Guard, the Royal Canadian Air Force and the unified Canadian Forces after 1968... Background The Voodoo's career as a fighter-bomber was relatively brief, but the reconnaissance versions served for some time. Along with the US Air Force's Lockheed U-2 and US Navy's Vought RF-8 Crusaders, the RF-101 reconnaissance variant of the Voodoo was instrumental during the Cuban Missile Crisis and saw extensive service during the Vietnam War. Interceptor versions served with the Air National Guard until 1982, and in Canadian service they were a front line part of NORAD until their replacement with the CF-18 Hornet in the 1980s. While the Voodoo was a moderate success, it may have been more important as an evolutionary step towards its replacement in most roles, the F-4 Phantom II, one of the most successful Western fighter designs of the 1960s. The Phantom would retain the twin engines, twin crew for interception duties, and a tail mounted well above and behind the jet exhaust but was an evolution of the F3H Demon while the Voodoo was developed from the earlier XF-88 Voodoo. Design and development Initial design on what would eventually become the Voodoo began just after World War II in response to a USAAF Penetration Fighter Competition in 1946. This called for a long-range, high-performance fighter to escort a new generation of bombers, much as the North American P-51 Mustang had escorted the B-17s and B-24s in World War II. Several companies responded with designs, and the Air Force provided funds for several of them to produce prototypes. After being awarded a contract (AC-14582) on 14 February 1947, McDonnell built two prototypes, designated the XF-88 Voodoo. The first prototype (serial number 46-6525), powered by two 3,000 lbf (13.3 kN) Westinghouse XJ34-WE-13 turbojets, flew from Muroc on 20 October 1948... The F-88 was redesignated the F-101 Voodoo in November 1951... The new design was considerably larger, carrying three times the initial fuel load and designed around larger, more powerful Pratt & Whitney J57 turbojets... The first F-101A was delivered on 2 May 1957 to the 27th Strategic Fighter Wing, which transferred to TAC in July that year... The F-101 set a number of speed records, including: a JF-101A (the ninth F-101A modified as a testbed for the more powerful J-57-P-53 engines of the F-101B) setting a world speed record of 1,207.6 mph (1,943.4 km/h) on 12 December 1957 during "Operation Firewall", beating the previous record of 1,132 mph (1,811 km/h) set by the Fairey Delta 2 in March the previous year. The record was then subsequently taken in May 1958 by a Lockheed F-104 Starfighter. On 27 November 1957, during "Operation Sun Run," an RF-101C set the Los Angeles-New York-Los Angeles record in 6 hours 46 minutes, the New York to Los Angeles record in 3 hours, 36 minutes, and the Los Angeles to New York record in 3 hours 7 minutes. A total of 77 F-101As were built. They were gradually withdrawn from service starting in 1966. Twenty-nine survivors were converted to RF-101G specifications with a modified nose, housing reconnaissance cameras in place of cannons and radar. These served with the Air National Guard through 1972...

The 10 Worst British Military Aircraft

The 10 Worst British Military Aircraft

Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/hush_kit PayPal - https://www.paypal.me/HushKit Blog - https://hushkit.net/ If you want something done slowly, expensively and possibly very well, you go to the British. While Britain created the immortal Spitfire, Lancaster and Edgley Optica, it also created a wealth of dangerous, disgraceful and diabolical designs. These are just ten plucked from a shortlist of thirty. In defining ‘worst’- we’ve looked for one, or a combination, of the following: design flaws, conceptual mistakes, being extremely dangerous, being unpleasant to fly, or obsolete at the point of service entry (and the type must have entered service). Grab a cup of tea, and prepare for ire as you read about ten machines they wanted your dad, grandad or great grandad to fly to war. I'd love to hear your opinions below. The original article can be found here: https://hushkit.net/2016/03/02/the-ten-worst-british-military-aircraft/ This channel is here as part of hushkit.net, the alternative aviation blog. You can follow our mad ramblings on Twitter @Hush_Kit Song 'I'm the king' by The Nurses

Grumman F-14 Tomcat in HD

Grumman F-14 Tomcat in HD

Like on FB: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Coolvid679/109371479175733 Don't Forget to Comment, Rate, and Subscribe! Thank's to FSXtreme Videos! for sharing the song idea with me! http://www.youtube.com/user/FSXtremeVideos Song: Finale by Madeon Speed & Angels http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1112756/ Clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqCl-uwgMV0

Douglas F4D-1 Skyray Operating Procedures circa 1956 US Navy Pilot Training Film

Douglas F4D-1 Skyray Operating Procedures circa 1956 US Navy Pilot Training Film

more at: http://scitech.quickfound.net/aviation_news_and_search.html Aircraft Familiarization: The F4D-1 Skyray: Operating Procedures... Ground Procedures... Starting... Takeoff... Normal Flight Procedures... High Speed Flight... Approach and Landing... Public domain film from the US Navy, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_F4D_Skyray The Douglas F4D Skyray (later redesignated F-6 Skyray) was an American carrier-based supersonic fighter/interceptor built by the Douglas Aircraft Company. Although it was in service for a relatively short time and never entered combat, it was notable for being the first carrier-launched aircraft to hold the world's absolute speed record, at 752.943 mph, and was the first United States Navy and United States Marine Corps fighter that could exceed Mach 1 in level flight. It was the last fighter produced by the Douglas Aircraft Company before it merged with McDonnell Aircraft and became McDonnell Douglas. The F5D Skylancer was an advanced development of the F4D Skyray that did not go into service... The Skyray was designed to meet a Navy requirement issued in 1947 for a fighter aircraft that could intercept and destroy an enemy aircraft at an altitude of 50,000 ft (15,240 m) within five minutes of the alarm being sounded. The Navy also wanted an aircraft that followed the designs and research of the German aerodynamicist Alexander Lippisch, who moved to the U.S. after World War II. The F4D Skyray was a wide delta wing design with long, sharply swept, rounded wings. The design was named for its resemblance to the manta ray. The thick wing roots contained the air intakes feeding a single turbojet engine. Fuel was contained both in the wings and the deep fuselage. Leading edge slats were fitted for increased lift during takeoff and landing, while the trailing edges were mostly elevon control surfaces. Additional pitch trimmers were fitted inboard near the jet exhaust, and were locked upwards on takeoff and landing. The Westinghouse J40 turbojet was the intended powerplant, but Douglas took a conservative view and designed in contingency options for other power plants. The J40 proved troublesome and was eventually cancelled, and the Skyray was fitted instead with the Pratt & Whitney J57, a more powerful but larger engine. Production aircraft were not delivered until early 1956, while the United States Marine Corps received their first in 1957. In total, 419 F4D-1 (later designated F-6 in the unified designation system) aircraft were produced. Its unique design also played a part in making the Skyray one of the best-known early jet fighters. Affectionately known as the "Ford" (after the "Four" and "D" of its designation). In 1953, Edward H. Heinemann was awarded the Collier Trophy in recognition of his design work on the F4D... The Skyray was designed exclusively for the high-altitude interception role with a spectacular rate and angle of climb. The Skyray set a new time to altitude record flying from a standing start to 49,221 feet (15,003 m) in 2 minutes and 36 seconds, all while flying at a 70° pitch angle. As a dedicated interceptor, the F4D was unsuited to the multi-mission capabilities soon in demand, so it had a short career in Navy and Marine Corps service, the last aircraft being withdrawn from service in 1964. Four aircraft were used by NACA (soon to be NASA) until 1969. Under the new 1962 United States Tri-Service aircraft designation system, the F4D-1 was redesignated the F-6A. The F4D (old designation) should not be confused with the F-4D (new designation) – the latter being the "D" variant of the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II operated by the U.S. Air Force...

P-63 Kingcobra: The American-Originated But More Success In The Hands Of Soviet Pilots

P-63 Kingcobra: The American-Originated But More Success In The Hands Of Soviet Pilots

The Bell P-63 Kingcobra is an American fighter aircraft developed by Bell Aircraft from the Bell P-39 Airacobra in an attempt to correct that aircraft's deficiencies. Although the P-63 was not accepted for combat use by the United States Army Air Forces, it was adopted by the Soviet Air Force. -------------------------------------- In case you want to DONATE: https://www.paypal.me/dungtransport Even the smallest donation is a great help to me. Thank you very much. -------------------------------------- Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AOMilitarylover/ If you have any questions, please leave a message below

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